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Security Council: The Special Representative for Iraq speaks of a country whose problems are aggravated by COVID-19 and the dramatic fall in the price of oil DinarDailyUpdates?bg=330099&fg=FFFFFF&anim=1

Security Council: The Special Representative for Iraq speaks of a country whose problems are aggravated by COVID-19 and the dramatic fall in the price of oil

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Security Council: The Special Representative for Iraq speaks of a country whose problems are aggravated by COVID-19 and the dramatic fall in the price of oil Empty Security Council: The Special Representative for Iraq speaks of a country whose problems are aggravated by COVID-19 and the dramatic fall in the price of oil

Post by claud39 on Wed May 13, 2020 10:23 am

[size=36]Security Council: The Special Representative for Iraq speaks of a country whose problems are aggravated by COVID-19 and the dramatic fall in the price of oil[/size]




MAY 12, 2020





Security Council: The Special Representative for Iraq speaks of a country whose problems are aggravated by COVID-19 and the dramatic fall in the price of oil SC%20slide







The full summary will be available later .)

The magnitude of the challenges facing Iraq cannot be overstated, the Secretary-General's Special Representative for the country said today in the Security Council. Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert cited the serious security, economic, social and political crisis, combined today with the COVID-19 pandemic and the dramatic fall in the price of oil. 

Social distancing obliges, it is each in his Mission that the 15 members of the Security Council make their statement and dialogue with their guests, thanks to a videoconferencing system specially designed for them.

The Special Representative welcomed the formation of the new Government led by Mr. Mustafa al-Kadhimi, who set out his priorities: the health crisis due to COVID-19; security sector development and reform; the exclusive prerogatives of the state in arms control; strengthening the economy; the fight against corruption and for justice; the organization of national dialogue; rebalancing of external relations; safeguarding the country's sovereignty; the return of the displaced to their place of origin; and the organization of early elections. 

Ms. Hennis-Plasschaert wanted to emphasize that if COVID-19 has silenced the street, people's confidence in public institutions is at an all-time low. Iraqis will continue to demand a more prosperous and inclusive country, and it will be up to the Government to demonstrate its ability to provide order and basic social services. 

To do this, the Special Representative rolled out her list: the country must reduce its dependence on oil, repair essential infrastructure, degrease an ineffective public service, set up viable public institutions, fight corruption, nepotism and patronage. , and adopt incentives for the private sector, while attracting foreign investment. As for security, she warned that Iraq cannot afford to become a receptacle for competition between foreign powers and their proxy wars. It will also be necessary to prevent the resurgence of violent extremism, and the best way to do so is to obtain from the Government that it works for its citizens and that it deals with the causes that allow groups like Daesh to exist.

The Press Releases Section only covers statements made by videoconference, the texts of which were received on time by the Security Council Affairs Division.

The magnitude of the challenges facing Iraq cannot be overstated, warned JEANINE HENNIS-PLASSCHAERT, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for the country . She said she spoke of the serious security, economic, social and political crisis, combined today with the COVID-19 pandemic and the dramatic fall in the price of oil. With the Iraqi health system already close to breaking point, the top priority, she said, is to prevent the spread of the virus. In this context, the Special Representative warned that no government response will succeed without the active involvement of the entire population. 

Echoing the Secretary-General's call for a global ceasefire, along with the other special representatives for the Middle East, Ms. Hennis-Plasschaert stressed that it must be a ceasefire - military but also political fire. Partisan postures and narrow interests must give way to the greater cause of the well-being of the Iraqi people. Unfortunately, she said, the economic situation is getting worse every day and political struggles continue, as evidenced by the fact that Iraq has seen three successive prime ministers in 10 weeks.

The Special Representative therefore welcomed the formation of a new government last week. The Council of Representatives has indeed confirmed Mr. Mustafa al-Kadhimi as Prime Minister and approved the program of his government as well as the appointment of 15 ministers out of 22. It is time to fill vacancies, including by appointing women and members of minorities, became impatient the Special Representative. 

She drew attention to the Prime Minister's priorities: the health crisis due to COVID-19; security sector development and reform; the exclusive prerogatives of the state in arms control; strengthening the economy; the fight against corruption and for justice; the organization of national dialogue; rebalancing of external relations; safeguarding the country's sovereignty; the return of the displaced to their place of origin; and the organization of early elections. Iraq, warned the Special Representative, cannot afford to take her time or waste it in petty and destructive political games.

Hennis-Plasschaert said she was encouraged by the first measures of the new Government but, she recognized, it will be important to manage the expectations of public opinion, by developing a response that involves the entire political class and all communities, with a sense of urgency, leveraging the strength of the country and prioritizing the public interest. If COVID-19 silenced the streets, people's confidence in public institutions is at an all-time low. Iraqis will continue to demand a more prosperous and inclusive country, and it will be up to the Government to demonstrate its ability to provide order and basic social services. 

With regard to early elections, for example, the Parliament has not yet completed its work on the electoral framework. The Special Representative particularly stressed the establishment of responsibilities and justice for the many dead and wounded among the demonstrators. Continuing on the economic situation, she saw the vulnerabilities of a country that has failed to embrace diversification. Monthly oil revenues fell from $ 6 billion to $ 1.4 billion between February and April. At a time when the international financial system is under pressure from all sides, it will be even more difficult for Iraq to access foreign funds. Added to this is the fact that curfews made necessary by the pandemic have brought commercial activity to a halt. 

The need to broaden the Iraqi tax base is more evident than ever. The Special Representative has rolled out her list: the country must reduce its dependence on oil, repair essential infrastructure, degrease an ineffective public service, build viable public institutions, fight corruption, nepotism and patronage, and adopt incentives for the private sector, while attracting foreign investment. Meanwhile, the Iraqi economy is expected to contract 9.7% in 2020, with poverty rates of around 40%. In this context, it cannot be overemphasized that corruption is perhaps the biggest cause of dysfunctions in Iraq, insisted the Special Representative.

As for security, she denounced incendiary rhetoric and attacks and counterattacks on Iraqi soil. How the armed elements, who have different ties to the state, choose to act today will determine how the Iraqis and others perceive them. Iraq cannot afford to become a receptacle for competition between foreign powers and their proxy wars. It is also necessary, continued the Special Representative, to prevent the resurgence of violent extremism and the best way to do so is to obtain from the Government that it works for its citizens and that it deals with the causes that allow groups like Daesh to exist. 

On the humanitarian front, the Special Representative denounced the fact that many partners are being denied their authorization to pass through checkpoints in their area of ​​operations. Access is even more restricted with COVID-19. Regarding relations between Baghdad and Erbil, she admitted that there is still no final agreement, fully approved and well implemented on essential issues such as the federal budget or the sharing of revenues and oil. Negotiations are continuing. As for Sinjar, she had only one word: "many promises but no signature, and it is the Yazidis who pay the price". 

Hoping that no party, personality or entity will take the legitimate claims of the Iraqi people hostage, the Special Representative paid tribute to Grand Ayatollah al-Sistani, "whose calm and wisdom serve as an example." Iraq, she concluded, must move away from endless crisis management to move to a more productive approach, strengthening the resilience of the state and society. Political and individual calculations do not serve the long-term interests of the country. "Quite the contrary," insisted the Special Representative.

to follow )




https://www.un.org/press/fr/2020/sc14183.doc.htm
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