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All About Growing Cabbage

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All About Growing Cabbage Empty All About Growing Cabbage

Post by alleyrose Tue Feb 04, 2014 3:37 pm

All About Growing Cabbage Colorful%20Cabbage%20Illustration
Dependable, nutritious, and delicious raw or cooked, both green and red cabbage are among the most productive cool-season crops. Gardeners growing cabbage in cool climates can grow huge, blue-ribbon heads. Where hot summers divide the cool seasons, fast-maturing varieties do well in spring and again in fall. All types of cabbage are at their best in late fall, after exposure to light frosts.

Types of Cabbage
Green cabbage varieties vary in their earliness and mature size. Smaller varieties can be grown at close spacing.
Red cabbage provides higher levels of vitamins A and C than other types of cabbage do, and its bright color is always beautiful on the plate.
Savoy cabbage produces a crisp heart and crinkled, dark green outer leaves.
Pointed cabbage develops conical instead of rounded heads. Its upright growth habit and tight outer leaves protect pointed cabbage from insects and sun.
Napa cabbage (or Chinese cabbage) matures quickly and produces crisp, mild-flavored leaves. Learn more in Growing Asian Greens.

When to Plant Cabbage
In spring, start seeds indoors or in a cold frame eight to 10 weeks before your last spring frost, and set out hardened-off seedlings when they are about 6 weeks old. Seeds germinate best at 65 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit.
In summer, start seeds 12 to 14 weeks before your first fall frost, and transplant the seedlings to the garden when they are 4 to 6 weeks old. Plant early and late varieties to stretch your harvest season.

How to Plant Cabbage
Growing cabbage plants requires regular feeding and abundant sun. Choose a sunny, well-drained site with fertile soil that has a pH between 6.0 and 6.5.
Loosen the planting bed and mix in a 2-inch layer of compost along with a standard application of a balanced organic fertilizer or well-composted manure. Water the fertilized bed thoroughly before setting out seedlings. Allow 18 to 20 inches between plants for 4-pound varieties; larger varieties may need more room. Varieties that will produce heads that weigh less than 2 pounds (check your seed packet) can be spaced 12 inches apart.

Harvesting and Storage
Begin harvesting cabbage when the heads feel firm, using a sharp knife to cut the heads from the stem. Remove and compost rough outer leaves, and promptly refrigerate harvested heads. If cut high, many varieties will produce several smaller secondary heads from the roots and crown left behind.
Cabbage will store in the refrigerator for two weeks or more, and you can keep your fall crop in cool storage for several months. Clean cabbage carefully, because heads may harbor hidden insects.
Cabbage yield is generally about 1 pound per foot of row. For the spring crop, three cabbage plants per person is probably sufficient for fresh eating. Grow another four plants per person in fall if you plan to store your cabbage or make sauerkraut.

Saving Seeds
Cabbage is a biennial crop that produces seed in its second year, after it has been exposed to cold weather. Most commercial cabbage seed is grown in Washington state, where winters are mild enough to allow the survival of seedlings set out in late summer. These plants form only small, loose heads before blooming and producing seeds the following summer. In colder climates, growers dig cabbage plants and move them to a cool root cellar for winter, burying the plants’ roots in buckets of moist sawdust. The stored heads are trimmed and replanted in early spring. Isolation is often required to keep cabbage from crossing with its close cousins, so you should grow only one type of cabbage for seed in a given year. Cabbage seeds will keep for five years if stored under excellent conditions.

Pest and Disease Prevention Tips

  • Tender cabbage seedlings may be felled in the night by soil-dwelling cutworms. To protect young seedlings, enclose their stems with stiff collars made from plastic cups, shallow cans or aluminum foil, pushed 1 inch into the soil.

  • Leaf-eating caterpillars — including armyworms, cabbage loopers and velvety green cabbageworms — frequently damage cabbage leaves. In summer, brightly marked harlequin bugs and grasshoppers can devastate young plants. The best way to prevent all of these problems is to install floating row covers the day you transplant the seedlings. Learn more in The No-Spray Way to Protect Plants.

  • Unless you have a heavy infestation, you can often keep plants healthy by watching them closely and handpicking pests. (Look closely — tiny green cabbageworms are very hard to see.) Biweekly sprays with a biological pesticide — Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) or spinosad — will control cabbageworms and other caterpillar-type cabbage pests. Handpick slugs and snails, which can often be found hiding on the undersides of the cabbage leaves closest to the ground.

  • Cabbage plants that suddenly collapse may have been hit by root maggots (rice-sized fly larvae that feed on cabbage roots). You can deter fly larvae by pressing the soil down firmly when setting out the seedlings. Rotate cabbage-family crops to deter this pest. In areas where canola is grown, use row covers to escape these ever-present maggots.



Tips for Growing Cabbage

  • Use cloches, row cover tunnels or other season-stretching devices to get your spring cabbage crop growing a few weeks early. In summer, use temporary shade covers after transplanting fall seedlings into hot summer soil.

  • Experiment with varieties, which can make a huge difference in the success of your crop. Fast-growing cabbage that form small heads (see Cabbage at a Glance chart) are great for space-squeezed gardens.

  • Give plants extra nitrogen just as small heads begin to form by drenching them with a liquid organic fertilizer.

  • Heavy rain can cause almost-ready cabbage heads to split. Prevent this by using a sharp spade to sever roots on opposite sides of the plant before an expected rain.




In the Kitchen
Various types of slaw made from raw, chopped cabbage are popular accompaniments for seafood and barbecue. Cooked cabbage recipes number in the thousands, from crunchy stir-fries to slow-cooked braises. Tame strong-flavored cabbage by chopping and then blanching it for one minute before proceeding with your recipe. Include a few fennel seeds in the cooking liquid to reduce cabbage’s cooking aroma. Large outer leaves may be blanched and frozen for later use making cabbage rolls. Chopped cabbage can be blanched and frozen, or fermented into sauerkraut. (Read Got Cabbage? Make Sauerkraut! to learn how to make your own kraut.)
Cabbage is a good source of vitamins A and C. Red cabbage and green cabbage that has tight, white cores typically contain high levels of vitamin C, while dark outer leaves offer an abundance of vitamin A. Homemade, fermented sauerkraut (or refrigerated kraut that hasn’t been heat-processed) contains health-enhancing nutrients and bacteria.
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Post by chilimama Fri May 22, 2015 12:29 pm

LOVE LOVE LOVE CABBAGE THX!
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Post by Goldiegirl Fri May 22, 2015 1:14 pm

It takes a fair bit of space to grow it so I just buy it locally from the farmers when it's here.

Cabbage is best eaten raw to get all the nutrients out of it. The best way I love it is to make coleslaw. A great salad during the summer and it goes with everything.

All About Growing Cabbage GL1B11_Creamy-Cole-Slaw_s4x3.jpg.rend.sni12col.landscape


Ingredients

1 head green cabbage, finely shredded
2 large carrots, finely shredded
3/4 cup best-quality mayonnaise
2 tablespoons sour cream
2 tablespoons grated Spanish onion
2 tablespoons sugar, or to taste
2 tablespoons white vinegar
1 tablespoon dry mustard
2 teaspoons celery salt
Salt and freshly ground pepper

Directions

Combine the shredded cabbage and carrots in a large bowl. Whisk together the mayonnaise, sour cream, onion, sugar, vinegar, mustard, celery salt, salt, and pepper in a medium bowl, and then add to the cabbage mixture. Mix well to combine and taste for seasoning; add more salt, pepper, or sugar if desired.

Recipe courtesy of Bobby Flay
CATEGORIES:

Cabbage Lunch Slaw

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Cooking Tips
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OR a more simple one.

All About Growing Cabbage Ie0102_coleslaw.jpg.rend.sni12col.landscape

Ingredients

6 cups shredded cabbage
1 cup shredded carrot
1 cup mayonnaise
1/4 cup white wine vinegar
1 teaspoon celery seed
1/4 cup sugar
Salt and pepper

Directions

In a large bowl, combine cabbage and carrots. In a smaller bowl, make dressing by combining mayonnaise, vinegar, celery seed, sugar, salt and pepper. Toss dressing into cabbage mixture and let chill. Serve in a family style bowl.
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Post by Goldiegirl Fri May 22, 2015 1:15 pm

15 Delicious Ways to Prepare a Humble Head of Cabbage

All About Growing Cabbage Food-5172659-small

Cabbage is one of the most underrated vegetables. This humble brassica was a mainstay of frugal diets the world over for the last few thousand years, but in modern days, when we have an abundance of other fruits and vegetables, it tends to fall by the wayside when we prepare meals. (See also: It Was on Sale. How Do I Cook It?)
Nevertheless, do not underestimate the cabbage, my friends. It is nutritious, lasts forever in the fridge, is one of the most frugal ways to make a meal, and can be incredibly delicious. This cruciferous vegetable has anti-carcinogenic properties which seem to be especially effective against colorectal cancer. And it also happens to be low in pesticides, so there's no need to buy organic. Now all you need to know is how to make it into a meal. (See also: How to Eat Fewer Pesticides and Save Money)

1. Stir-Fried Spicy Cabbage

This is one of my go-to meals when there's nothing in the fridge but a head of cabbage and a few eggs. Basically, you heat a skillet over high heat, pour in some oil, add chopped cabbage, stir-fry it until it is crisp-tender and charred in some spots, and then add soy sauce and chili sauce. Top it with a couple of fried eggs and call it dinner! I first learned about this quick, high-heat method of cooking cabbage from Orangette (although I omit the fennel and add garlic), and it has become one of my regular meal options ever since.

2. Braised Red Cabbage

All About Growing Cabbage Food-4420499-small-ggnoads
Braised red cabbage is one of my favorite sides during the winter holidays and goes well with everything from baked ham to bratwurst. It's comforting, warm, and simple to prepare. Just put oil, cabbage, vinegar, and brown sugar into a pot and let the whole thing simmer until the cabbage is tender, about an hour. Here's a yummy version of braised red cabbage with bacon.

3. Cabbage Slaw

It doesn't get any simpler. Shredded cabbage, tossed with dressing (I love poppyseed or peanut dressing). You can get a little fancier by adding other shredded fruits and vegetables — carrots, broccoli, apples — as well as add-ins such as dried cranberries, pine nuts, and herbs. Here's a cabbage and broccoli slaw, and I also like to make an Asian-style slaw using shredded napa cabbage and a slightly sweet rice vinegar dressing.

4. Cabbage Soup

Throwing cabbage into a soup is a great way to use up the half a head leftover from coleslaw. Here's a hearty rustic cabbage soup that pairs budget-friendly cabbage with potatoes and white beans for a filling and frugal meal. You could also try a classic borscht. You can add almost any vegetable to cabbage and stock to make a soup, so use up what's in your fridge! (See also: Delicious Soup From Leftovers)

5. Cabbage Rolls

Classic cabbage rolls are delicious, healthy, and a great way to feed a crowd. Meat, rice, and seasonings are wrapped in cabbage and slowly simmered in tomato sauce. Here's an easy version of cabbage rolls for the slow cooker, and here's a simple stove-top version.

6. Cabbage Kimchi

All About Growing Cabbage Food-4893425-small-ggnoads
Kimchi is one of my favorite condiments. This tangy, spicy, Korean cabbage pickle adds zing as well as nutrients to a slew of dishes. You can find kimchi at Asian markets and larger supermarkets (or have a go at making kimchi yourself). Add it to burgers, tacos, cheese quesadillas (one of my favorites), or make an easy kimchi fried rice. Serve it on top of steamed rice with leftovers and a fried egg for a quick meal.

7. Baja Fish Tacos

Authentic Baja-style fish tacos are topped with cabbage instead of lettuce. Just pan-fry a batch of white fish (tilapia is affordable and has a mild flavor), slip them into warm corn or flour tortillas, and add shredded cabbage, salsa, fresh Mexican cheese (queso fresco), and a squeeze of lime. I like to add a yogurt sauce made of plain yogurt, lime juice, salt, and chili powder.

8. Stir-Fried Noodles With Cabbage

A lot of stir-fried noodle dishes include cabbage. This recipe for Shanghai-style noodles with Napa cabbage looks especially savory and delicious. You can also make a simple noodle dish using chow mein, cooked ramen noodles, or even cooked spaghetti in a pinch. Stir-fry some meat and cabbage, add the cooked noodles, and add condiments such as soy sauce, oyster sauce, salt, and sugar. (See also: 16 Cheap, Low-Cal Condiments)

9. Cabbage Stew

Cabbage can be a hearty, nutritious, and frugal component in a stew, providing a delicious one-pot meal. Try this Italian sausage and cabbage stew, or this gluten-free Irish potato and cabbage stew.

10. Cabbage Hash

If you have leftover corned beef (or just use some bacon) you can easily make cabbage hash for brunch. For variety, try making it with chopped Brussels sprouts (or as I like to call them, "mini cabbages"). Serve it with a couple fried eggs for a delicious breakfast.

11. Indian Spicy Cabbage

This simple-to-make, turmeric-spiked Indian cabbage dish is a fragrant side dish to accompany curries, Tandoori chicken, or any main dish. With just five ingredients (not including oil and salt), this flavorful dish is easy to put together.

12. Roasted Cabbage Wedges

Almost everything tastes better roasted, so why not cabbage, too? Toss cabbage wedges with oil, salt and pepper, and some caraway seeds and roast them in the oven. While you're at it, roast some potatoes and perhaps some chicken legs for a hands-off dinner.

13. Sauerkraut

All About Growing Cabbage Food-5074253-small-ggnoads
Sauerkraut, or fermented, preserved cabbage, has a long history as a frugal way to preserve vegetables for the winter. Germanic and Eastern European peoples would salt down the cabbage in barrels with spices and sometimes wine, creating a tangy dish that is still popular today, especially for traditions like celebrating the New Year. Today, there's no need to ferment your own sauerkraut (though it might be a fun experiment), as it is readily available in jars or at delis. This nutritious side dish goes especially well with grilled sausages and pork. It's also delicious on a hot dog.

14. Red Lentil and Cabbage Dal

Put lentils and cabbage together and you've got a SUPER frugal, healthy meal. Lentils provide protein without the fat of meat, and they're cheap and tasty, too. Simmer red lentils until soft, then add cabbage cooked with complex spices, and you've got dinner covered. Add salad and perhaps some naan bread for wiping up the flavorful sauce.

15. Colcannon

A traditional Irish dish, colcannon is a mixture of mashed potatoes, cabbage or kale, onions, and spices. I like this recipe for colcannon with kale for an extra punch of color and nutrients. Did you know that kale is a form of wild cabbage? However, you can always substitute cooked cabbage for the kale if you're not a fan.
Cabbage is one of the best resources for creating frugal meals from scratch, so give it chance if you don't cook with it often. Getting creative with a few new cabbage recipes just might make you fall in love with this humble vegetable.

Click on the link to get the links for these recipes.

http://www.wisebread.com/15-delicious-ways-to-prepare-a-humble-head-of-cabbage
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Post by Ponee Fri May 22, 2015 1:45 pm

I LOVE Cabbage so I LOVE THIS THREAD!  THANKS LADIES FOR SHARING !
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Post by Goldiegirl Fri May 22, 2015 1:58 pm

I think I want to try the Dal recipe.  All About Growing Cabbage 1150991001
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Post by Ponee Fri May 22, 2015 2:10 pm

I am going to go down the list and make them all.  LOL
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Post by Ponee Fri May 22, 2015 2:14 pm

Here is an interesting  link for using cabbage as a probiotic recipe that @Goldpeg gave us a few years ago...



https://www.dinardaily.net/t9663-cabbage-rejuvelac-make-your-own-probiotics
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Post by Goldiegirl Fri May 22, 2015 2:36 pm

Ponee wrote:Here is an interesting  link for using cabbage as a probiotic recipe that @Goldpeg gave us a few years ago...



https://www.dinardaily.net/t9663-cabbage-rejuvelac-make-your-own-probiotics


I wonder how it turned out. I don't see a followup after it finished brewing.

omg
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