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THE ARAB MONETARY FUND ISSUES THE FIFTH EDITION OF A POLICY BRIEF ENTITLED SMART CITIES IN THE ARAB STATES: LESSONS INSPIRED BY GLOBAL EXPERIENCES DinarDailyUpdates?bg=330099&fg=FFFFFF&anim=1

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THE ARAB MONETARY FUND ISSUES THE FIFTH EDITION OF A POLICY BRIEF ENTITLED SMART CITIES IN THE ARAB STATES: LESSONS INSPIRED BY GLOBAL EXPERIENCES

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THE ARAB MONETARY FUND ISSUES THE FIFTH EDITION OF A POLICY BRIEF ENTITLED SMART CITIES IN THE ARAB STATES: LESSONS INSPIRED BY GLOBAL EXPERIENCES Empty THE ARAB MONETARY FUND ISSUES THE FIFTH EDITION OF A POLICY BRIEF ENTITLED SMART CITIES IN THE ARAB STATES: LESSONS INSPIRED BY GLOBAL EXPERIENCES

Post by claud39 on Sun Aug 18, 2019 7:54 am

THE ARAB MONETARY FUND ISSUES THE FIFTH EDITION OF A POLICY BRIEF ENTITLED SMART CITIES IN THE ARAB STATES: LESSONS INSPIRED BY GLOBAL EXPERIENCES




2019-08-18





THE ARAB MONETARY FUND ISSUES THE FIFTH EDITION OF A POLICY BRIEF ENTITLED SMART CITIES IN THE ARAB STATES: LESSONS INSPIRED BY GLOBAL EXPERIENCES Logo-ar





Increased global interest in the concept of “smart cities” as governments need to meet the growing needs of the population, as well as the technical developments associated with the Fourth Industrial Revolution

According to international estimates, the size of the smart city market is expected to rise to $ 717 billion in 2023, with a CAGR of 18.4 percent

There is a strong positive relationship between smart cities and economic prosperity and growth through the role of new technologies in raising efficiency and productivity and improving governance

Arab countries have recently moved to smart cities as they seek to meet the needs of their citizens and address the pressures of increasing urbanization.

The number of smart cities in the Arab countries is 24, representing about 21% of the total Arab cities

There are elements that some Arab cities enjoy especially in the light of the modernity of some cities. However, “financing” and the availability of legal, regulatory and institutional framework are the most important challenges

 

As part of its keenness to develop its research activities, the Arab Monetary Fund has launched a new periodical research series entitled 'Policy Brief', which aims to support the decision-making process in the Arab countries by providing brief research publications that address the most important priorities and topics of interest to member countries with recommendations for policy makers. In this context, the Fund issued [url=https://www.amf.org.ae/sites/default/files/%D9%85%D9%88%D8%AC%D8%B2 %D8%B3%D9%8A%D8%A7%D8%B3%D8%A7%D8%AA - %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B9%D8%AF%D8%AF %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AE%D8%A7%D9%85%D8%B3 - %D8%A7%D9%84%D9%85%D8%AF%D9%86 %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B0%D9%83%D9%8A%D8%A9 %D9%81%D9%8A %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AF%D9%88%D9%84 %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B9%D8%B1%D8%A8%D9%8A%D8%A9 %D8%AF%D8%B1%D9%88%D8%B3 %D9%85%D8%B3%D8%AA%D9%88%D8%AD%D8%A7%D8%A9 %D9%85%D9%86 %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AA%D8%AC%D8%A7%D8%B1%D8%A8 %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B9%D8%A7%D9%84%D9%85%D9%8A%D8%A9.pdf]the fifth issue[/url] of the series entitled "Smart Cities in the Arab States: Lessons inspired by Global Experiences".


The Policy Brief noted that 55 per cent of the world's population now lives in urban areas and is expected to rise to 68 per cent by 2050. [1] Naturally, the steady growth of urban populations increases the responsibilities of governments. In this context, the shift towards smart cities is one of the most important mechanisms by which governments are able to meet the increasing needs of the population of public services and modern infrastructure such as energy, water, roads, communications, health and others, benefiting in this context from the rapid technological developments in various fields during the Fourth Industrial Revolution, Especially robots, the Internet of Things, artificial intelligence, block chain, biotechnology, self-driving cars, cryptocurrencies, big data, cloud servers, and more. Smart Cities are also benefiting from the rapid developments in 5G networks - the latest wireless communication system - because of the tremendous potential of this technology to connect devices reliably to the Internet and other devices, transfer data more quickly, and process a huge amount of data in the fastest time. It is reported that the size of the smart city market has recently increased significantly to about $ 308 billion in 2018 and is expected to reach $ 717.2 billion in 2023 at a CAGR of 18.4 per cent. 
[2]
There is no specific definition of the concept of "smart city" because of its breadth and overlap with many other concepts. Where the concept arose more than a decade ago and contributed to the formation of economists, legislators and responsible for urban planning.
 [3] As defined by ITU, “a sustainable smart city is an innovative city that uses ICTs to improve the quality of life, efficiency of urban processes and services, and competitiveness, while meeting the needs of current and future generations with regard to economic, social, environmental and cultural aspects” (4) ]).
Several empirical studies point to the strong positive relationship between smart city and economic prosperity and growth. The main objective of building smart cities is to improve the quality of life in its various dimensions to ensure a high level of well-being, security and sustainability for citizens.
 The concept of “smart city” has always been linked to sustainable development, because the use of new technologies in various economic lifestyles often addresses bottlenecks in sustainable growth, particularly in the rational allocation of resources for environmental conservation. Economists also view the Smart City as an integrated environmental framework that leads to economic growth by raising efficiency and productivity, encouraging innovation, reducing unemployment, increasing incomes, and improving the quality of life.
Although there is no standardized classification of smart city indicators, there are a set of indicators that are used to measure the extent of e-readiness. Smart, national and regional considerations that measure the level of cooperation and homogeneity between cities in the same state. On the other hand, three indicators describing the competitiveness of smart cities in a number of geographic regions of the world have recently been presented in an intensive study on smart cities and ways to measure their competitiveness. [6] Including:
Smart City Technology Infrastructure Capacity Indicator (which measures the readiness of the Smart City technology infrastructure, which is one of the most important elements of success in the transition to smart cities) Singapore leads the world in this index (25 degrees), followed by a slight difference New York City (24.4 degrees). In the Middle East, Abu Dhabi is at the forefront of Smart Cities (18.4 °) and Dubai (17.3 °).
Smart City Application Dependency Indicator: The transition to smart city depends on the spread of smart applications that provide practical solutions to the challenges faced by the city's population, saving time and cost and increasing the efficiency of operations and in the levels of ease and ease of access to services within the framework of the smart city. New York and London are the world's top cities (34.5 degrees), followed by Seoul (33 degrees). At the regional level, Dubai ranks high (30.5 °), followed by Abu Dhabi (28 °).
Awareness of the use of applications and the extent of satisfaction Citizen satisfaction and the extent of its interaction with electronic applications adopted within the framework of smart cities is one of the most important elements of the success of the transition to smart cities. Beijing tops this index (24.2 degrees), followed by San Francisco (20.7 degrees). Dubai and Abu Dhabi are also in the forefront in the region with 16.6 and 10.5 degrees respectively.
The summary touched on the outstanding international experiences in the field of smart cities. The results of these reports vary among them due to the different methodologies and schools of thought to which they belong. These reports suggest that smart cities can be new cities designed and built in a smart way from the start using strategies developed for this purpose, or traditional cities that have gradually been transformed into fully smart cities and enhanced urban plans. 
In general, there are no complete smart cities to date due to their wide requirements, which are not limited to technology, but include the organizational, social and political side, but there is differentiation among cities according to their successes in the field of transformation into smart cities.
The report also showcased the experiences of some smart cities globally, including Boston, Massachusetts, where the city adopted the concept of smart city to achieve tangible progress towards reducing social disparities and enhance the resilience of the urban population. 
Since 2014, Singapore is looking to become a smart city within the framework of the Smart Home Strategy, based on five national projects that led the first phase of the Smart Home Strategy, the most important of which is the National Digital Identity, which enabled citizens and businesses to interact digitally in a secure environment. 
"Electronic payments" for safe and easy payments, and the "National Smart Sensor Platform" that integrates IoT sensors to make the city livable, safe, and more. The summary also touched upon the experience of Barcelona, ​​one of the most intelligent cities in Europe, where it adopted smart irrigation techniques used in many parks. 
A network of buried sensors monitors the irrigation process and records information on garden soil. In addition, existing industrial buildings have been converted and renovated so that the incinerators become combined cycle power plants. In addition to Tokyo, one of the world's most innovative cities, the city offers new technological trends and innovations to improve people's lives. The city is working on environmental policies to help it achieve sustainable growth.
 In addition to Tokyo, one of the world's most innovative cities, the city offers new technological trends and innovations to improve people's lives. The city is working on environmental policies to help it achieve sustainable growth. In addition to Tokyo, one of the world's most innovative cities, the city offers new technological trends and innovations to improve people's lives. The city is working on environmental policies to help it achieve sustainable growth.
The Japanese city of Fujisawa is an example of an eco-friendly smart city whose buildings conserve heat and produce clean energy using solar panels and natural gas-powered generators. It self-supplies energy for 3 full days.
 Songdo, one of South Korea's cities, has spent billions of dollars building a smart city. Among the most important areas he has invested are integrated real-time traffic control systems, parking detection systems, crime detection, emergency reporting, and others using visual imaging and high alert sounds. Applications are also used on mobile phones to control heat and lighting in housing remotely. 
These investments are carried out using public-private partnerships, where the government owns a share of 28. The remaining 6 per cent is owned by the private sector. This experience attracted the attention of the world and established a national company specialized in providing consultancy in the field of partnership contracts to build smart cities in a number of countries in the world.


The policy brief noted that smart cities require substantial inputs from physical and human capital to produce and distribute technology. The first task is to provide the appropriate infrastructure and technical personnel to run projects, and then bring new technology commensurate with the needs of the community, whether in the field of transport, communications or safety, and others.
 Funding comes at the forefront of the challenges facing many cities around the world as they become smart cities. The competent authorities in these cities are devising practical ways to finance smart projects. In the next few years, public-private partnerships are expected to be the dominant mode of financing smart city transformation projects.
At the level of Arab countries, the summary pointed out that the Arab governments, for their part, turned to the shift towards smart cities in light of the pressures resulting from the high levels of urbanization in many Arab countries, and the consequent pressures to provide appropriate services to the urban population. 
He pointed out that the number of smart cities in the Arab countries is about 24 smart cities out of 115 major cities in the Arab countries, which represents about 21% of the total Arab cities. The UAE and Qatar lead the Arab countries in terms of the percentage of smart cities to the total major cities with 50% and 43% respectively, while 46% of smart cities in the Arab world are available in three countries: UAE, Qatar and Saudi Arabia.


The summary touches on some of the leading Arab experiences in the field of transformation towards smart cities. private sector. To support the transformation of Amman into a sustainable and smart city, the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) program was established to adopt low-emission energy sources and to launch a number of initiatives related to sustainable energy, urban transport, municipal waste and urban afforestation.
Dubai in the UAE is also one of the leading Arab cities that have taken systematic measures to become a smart city with a comprehensive concept. DEWA has launched smart grid initiatives including the installation of smart meters and charging stations for electric vehicles as part of its efforts to support the use of renewable solar energy. The Government of Dubai has also embarked on the introduction of smart technology in government institutions 14 years ago as part of the e-government project. This approach has had an enhanced impact in providing a solid platform for easy transition to Smart City.
 As Abu Dhabi City moves towards a knowledge economy to support economic diversification efforts, the government has adopted a strategy to develop a smart green city in the middle of the desert, Masdar City. It is hoped that Masdar will serve as a city for sustainable growth. Egypt also started planning to enter the era of smart cities recently through the integration of this concept in the new cities that are being established and the monitoring of investment budgets to support the construction of these cities.
 The New Administrative Capital project, which began in 2017, is at the forefront of the Egyptian government's efforts to move towards smart cities. The key to the success of this city is the integration of the transformation of smart cities from the beginning of the city's creation, allowing the integration of smart infrastructure in all buildings and roads of the city. The total area of ​​the city is 170 thousand feddans, and a number of government agencies and ministries will be transferred to this city. The city is also expected to create about 2 million jobs.
In general, there are many elements that must be available to transform Arab cities into smart cities, the most important of which are: the availability of energy sources to operate the infrastructure and information systems, and the governments of Arab countries to pay attention to the concept of smart cities, and the availability of human element and smart minds, in addition to integration and positive interaction by Residents of Arab cities, and provide legal, legislative and institutional frameworks supporting the transformation process, especially in terms of ensuring the security of smart systems, protecting privacy, protecting consumers and ensuring fair competition.
Some Arab cities have the potential to become smart cities, the most important of which is the tendency of some Arab countries to establish new cities such as the "new administrative capital" in Cairo, "Masdar City" in Abu Dhabi, and others, which will make it easier for the authorities. The competent authorities adopt smart technologies in the infrastructure of these cities, in addition to persuading their residents to respond to these technologies when accessing public services or community outreach. However, these experiences face some challenges, the most important of which are:

  • The aging of infrastructure in a number of Arab cities and the need for modernization to respond to the technical transformation, including the required investments and visions of urban transformation.

  • To seek practical mechanisms to support projects to transform smart cities in light of the challenges facing Arab governments and the pressures they are witnessing in terms of their public budgets.

  • Work to provide the regulatory and legal framework in some of these cities to respond to the benefits of technical transformation.

  • More emphasis is needed on the development of the ICT sector, which is the cornerstone for supporting the transition to smart cities.

  • More successful partnerships with the private sector to implement projects included in the transformation plans for smart and sustainable cities.



In this context, some policy-making conclusions can be reached regarding the transformation of Arab cities into smart cities, including:


  • Develop an integrated smart city strategy based on the survey of stakeholders in different areas (urban planning, business community, academic community, civil society organizations, legislators, etc.) to identify their views on the benefits of the transition to smart cities, and to meet the challenges in this regard.

  • Leading a wide awareness campaign involving various institutions and segments of society and aiming to raise awareness and promote the Smart City and demonstrate its importance for the welfare, security and sustainability, and work to provide the preconditions for the success of the Smart City. 

  • Arab countries should benefit from the successful international experiences in the field of transformation into smart city, especially by focusing on the targeted sectors to meet the needs of society in them, such as transport, health, energy, and others.  

  • Focusing on emerging technologies in data and information systems, especially through “open data” that has allowed a great deal of interaction between citizens, businesses, and competent government institutions. There is also great interest in e-government, which has contributed significantly to the ease of access of citizens to public services, which are provided with high quality and affordable cost.   

  • Benefiting from public-private partnership contracts, including attracting foreign direct and specialized investments in the field of smart cities, provided that this is preceded by providing the appropriate regulatory and legal framework.

  • Each Arab city should determine the priorities of intelligent transformation according to its conditions and problems and that this transformation should be gradual in order to allow the degree of societal acceptance necessary for the transformation.

  • Study the feasibility of integrating smart infrastructure in the new Arab cities from the beginning of its creation due to the ease of integration during the process of establishing cities instead of turning cities afterwards to become smart.



 

 

[1] United Nations (2019) Available at: https://www.un.org/development/desa/en/news/population/2018-world-urbanization-prospects.html [Accessed 25 July, 2019].

[2] Intelligent Transport (2019), Available at: https://www.intelligenttransport.com/transport-news/74525/smart-city-market-billion-research/, [Accessed 20 July, 2019].

[3] IEEE (2018) Available at: http://cse.stfx.ca/~smartcity2018/index.php [Accessed 15 July, 2019]  

[4] International Telecommunication Union (2019) “Smart Sustainable Cities”, Available at: https://www.itu.int/en/mediacentre/backgrounders/Pages/smart-sustainable-cities.aspx, [Accessed 10 July, 2019 ]

[5] Woetzel, J. et al. (2018) “Smart Cities: Digital Solutions for a More Livable Future”, McKinsey & Company.

[6] McKinney Global Institute. (2018). “Smart Cities: Digital Solutions for A More Livable Future”

 

The full version of the report is available at:








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