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Security Council: The financial situation of the 1540 Committee on the Non-Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction gives cause for concern

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Security Council: The financial situation of the 1540 Committee on the Non-Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction gives cause for concern Empty Security Council: The financial situation of the 1540 Committee on the Non-Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction gives cause for concern

Post by claud39 on Wed Mar 20, 2019 9:42 am

https://www.un.org/press/fr/2019/cs13742.doc.htm




[size=36]Security Council: The financial situation of the 1540 Committee on the Non-Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction gives cause for concern[/size]


MARCH 19, 2019





Security Council: The financial situation of the 1540 Committee on the Non-Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction gives cause for concern SC%20slide





The Chairman of the Committee established pursuant to resolution 1540 (2004) warned the Security Council this morning that unless a solution to financial problems is found by the end of April, the The Committee will face "enormous" difficulties in honoring its obligations, even though the goal of blocking non-State actors' access to weapons of mass destruction is considered an international priority.
"Just think of the use of chemical weapons by groups like Daesh to tell us what's at stake," said the United Kingdom, supported by Belgium, who warned that nuclear, chemical and biological terrorist groups could provoke "far more tragic" attacks than those of today, with improvised explosive devices, knives and small arms. 
Considered by many Member States, including the Russian Federation and Germany, as the "cornerstone" of the global non-proliferation regime, resolution 1540 (2004) requires all States to abstain. to provide support, in whatever form, to non-State actors attempting to develop, procure, manufacture, possess, transport, transfer or use nuclear, chemical weapons or biological or their vectors.  
It also obliges all States to put in place internal control mechanisms to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction or their means of delivery, including the establishment of appropriate control mechanisms for related matters. The resolution also emphasizes the need to assist States that so request to fulfill their obligations under the resolution. To date, the Chairperson of the Committee said, 21 requests for assistance are still open and in 2018, nine new requests for assistance have been submitted.
Mr. Dian Triansyah Djani, who is also the representative of Indonesia, also warned that this year, because of the financial problems of the United Nations, the contracts of experts of the Committee are only four months. In recognition of the importance of non-proliferation issues, the United States has requested the United Nations Secretariat to ensure that the Committee has the necessary resources to recruit "the most talented and capable staff possible."
While the overall review of the implementation of resolution 1540, scheduled for April 2021, is under preparation, the Chairperson of the Committee reported "significant progress", stating that, to date, 182 States have submitted their initial report and provided the Committee with information on the measures they have taken or intend to take to fulfill their obligations under the resolution.
The Committee has developed regional training programs for focal points of Member States, including one, next week, in cooperation with the African Union, for focal points in English-speaking countries of the continent. In addition, the Committee has continued to interact directly with Member States through greater use of regional organizations and regional centers of the United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs, including Peru, Togo and Equatorial Guinea. It has also intensified its work with international organizations whose mandate is directly related to resolution 1540, including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW).
The Committee, the Russian Federation advises, needs to identify new lines of cooperation and contribute to the search for common positions on non-proliferation, "at a time when this problem is becoming more and more serious", as evidenced by the expansion of "chemical terrorism" in Syria and the risk of non-state actors migrating to third countries with weapons of mass destruction.
Cote d'Ivoire called on States to work synergistically to identify good practices against the diversion of chemical agents, with a focus on border control, monitoring of financial flows and Internet networks, legal aid and the adaptation of the means of struggle to the evolution of the threat. 
Supported by Poland, the United States has found it necessary to address the issue of emerging technologies, including drones that can be used as weapons of mass destruction, and synthetic biology, which is already reconfiguring the way in which scientists conduct their research. France has also worried about the "instrumentalisation" of emerging technologies. The role of the industrial sector has been emphasized many times. As the Chairperson of the Committee emphasized the importance of the Wiesbaden Process conferences, Germany stressed that the involvement of industry can make proposals and strengthen cooperation with the industry. even inside the sector, is useful for identifying measures that could impede the access of non-state actors to weapons of mass destruction. Equatorial Guinea has insisted on good management and supervision of uranium mining.
NON-PROLIFERATION OF WEAPONS OF MASSIVE DESTRUCTION
declarations
Mr. DIAN TRIANSYAH DJANI (Indonesia), Chairman of the Security Council Committee established pursuant to resolution 1540 (2004) "Committee 1540" , reported that significant progress has been made in implementing the said resolution, stating that 182 States submitted their initial reports and provided the Committee with information on the measures they have taken or intend to take to fulfill their obligations under the resolution. He also said that in October 2018, two Committee experts went to Mali to help the authorities draft their first report. In addition, said the President, I myself sent letters to States that have not yet submitted their report to urge them to provide information and help the Committee prepare for the next comprehensive review.
Mr. Djani stressed the importance of States developing a national implementation program to identify the measures needed to fill the gaps in regulation and control frameworks, promote cooperation and identify areas where help is needed. He said the County will continue to work with Member States, including the workshop in Togo and another planned in Madagascar. Noting that a growing number of States have undergone peer review, Djani welcomed the prospect of seeing the results of those meetings later this year.
To date, 105 Member States have informed the Committee of their National Focal Point, while Hungary, India and Turkey have provided updated information. The Committee has also developed regional training programs for these focal points and will organize next week, in cooperation with the African Union, training for the focal points of the English-speaking countries of the continent.
Referring to the role of the Committee in facilitating state aid, the President said that, to date, 21 requests for assistance are still open. In recent months, assistance has been provided to Togo and Zambia for the strategic control of trade, in cooperation with the World Customs Organization (WCO). In addition, in 2018, nine new requests for assistance were submitted by Bahrain, Burundi, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Equatorial Guinea, Iraq, Madagascar, Mali and Peru. Some 47 States and 16 organizations informed the Committee of their assistance programs and letters were sent to States and international, regional and subregional organizations to do the same.
Mr. Djani said that one of the Committee's priorities is to interact directly with Member States, through visits and round tables, by making greater use of regional organizations and also regional centers of the United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs. 'UN. The Committee cooperated with the United Nations Regional Center for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean to organize a round table last November in Peru. Workshops have also been held more recently in Equatorial Guinea and Togo with the support of the United Nations Regional Center for Peace and Disarmament in Africa. The Committee has also intensified its work with international organizations whose mandate is directly related to resolution 1540,
The Chair then spoke of efforts to improve the Committee's website and to strengthen links with parliamentarians through the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU). Moreover, an effective partnership between States and the industry sector is essential to the success of non-proliferation efforts, he added, referring in particular to the conferences organized under the Wiesbaden Process.
After discussing the preparations for the comprehensive review of the implementation of resolution 1540, scheduled for 2021, Mr. Djani warned that this year the contracts of the Committee's experts are only of four months because of the financial problems of the United Nations. In the absence of a solution by the end of April, the Committee will face enormous difficulties in fulfilling its obligations.
Mr. JONATHAN R. COHEN ( United States) welcomed the renewed energy provided to the 1540 Committee by Indonesia and the determination of the United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs to contribute to the implementation of "the only legally binding instrument" to control the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. In the future, the Security Council will need to review the implementation of this resolution, he said, which encouraged Member States that have not yet done so to transmit their reports and set up focal points to liaise with the Committee. Those who require assistance to implement Resolution 1540 must apply for it, he added. As we prepare to renew the mandate of the 1540 Committee, said the representative, we call on the other members of the Council to adapt to the evolving threats that fall under the said resolution. We need to look at emerging technologies such as drones that can be used as weapons of mass destruction or synthetic biology that changes the way scientists conduct their research. Mr. Cohen asked the Secretariat to ensure that the Committee has the resources to recruit the most talented and knowledgeable staff possible, as the issue of non-proliferation is "too big". We need to look at emerging technologies such as drones that can be used as weapons of mass destruction or synthetic biology that changes the way scientists conduct their research. Mr. Cohen asked the Secretariat to ensure that the Committee has the resources to recruit the most talented and knowledgeable staff possible, as the issue of non-proliferation is "too big". We need to look at emerging technologies such as drones that can be used as weapons of mass destruction or synthetic biology that changes the way scientists conduct their research. Mr. Cohen asked the Secretariat to ensure that the Committee has the resources to recruit the most talented and knowledgeable staff possible, as the issue of non-proliferation is "too big".
Mr JOB OBIANG ESONO MBENGONO ( Equatorial Guinea) recalled that, thanks to the Pelindaba Treaty, Africa has become a region free of nuclear weapons. In this context, the management and supervision of uranium mining are important. He wished that, as provided for in the Treaty, this mineral be used for peaceful purposes. After raising the issue of nuclear disarmament, he welcomed Viet Nam's efforts to hold talks on 28 February between the Governments of the United States and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK). and hoped that Pyongyang and Washington would make further progress towards the goal of denuclearizing the Korean peninsula. He then praised the valuable contributions of "regulatory bodies", believing that their work on "harmonization of standards" is crucial. The dissemination of the resolutions should not be done only by the adaptation of the legislation but also by a technical support, concerning among others points of entry and exit at the borders, estimated the representative.
Mr STEPHEN HICKEY ( United Kingdom ) pointed out that resolution 1540 was the cornerstone of the international non-proliferation architecture. Just think of the use of chemical weapons by groups like Daesh to report on the issues, he said. He welcomed the fact that the Committee had adopted its work program early this year, and its focus on the implementation of resolution 1540. All States, he stressed, needed to ensure that updating their mechanisms, "especially those that are the hinge of the supply chain". Appointing focal points and implementing national programs are pragmatic measures available to all, he said.
He then referred to the forthcoming comprehensive review of resolution 1540, scheduled for 2021, and assured that his country would do its utmost to ensure that the process resulted in a "pragmatic" outcome. Recognizing that implementation of the resolution is not easy, he assured that his government is ready to help. In this respect, Working Group 2, chaired by France, is of particular importance, he added, before expressing concern about the Committee's financial situation. He emphasized his country's concern over the use of chemical weapons by States, worrying about the impact on the non-proliferation architecture. He mentioned the cases of Syria and Salisbury.
Mr JOSÉ SINGER WEISINGER ( Dominican Republic) emphasized the crucial role of UNSCR 1540 in preventing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their access by non-state actors, including terrorists. Referring to the chemical weapons attack on the city of Douma, Syria, in April 2018, he said that these facts are in addition to the list of cases of use of chemical weapons in that country and in Iraq. The delegate was also concerned about nuclear proliferation on the Korean peninsula. While he welcomed the political and diplomatic progress, he stressed that the evidence is there to demonstrate the existence of nuclear facilities and ballistic missiles in the DPRK, activities that are developing.
To honor its obligations under international disarmament and non-proliferation instruments, the Dominican Republic will conduct a peer-to-peer assessment with Panama, with the aim of sharing experiences and good practices in the implementation of the Convention. implementation of that resolution. It will focus on the revision of national and international legislation, strategic trade, safe transportation, and chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive emergency risk management. The representative also drew attention to the assistance provided to countries in the implementation of resolution 1540 by the United Nations Regional Center for Peace. disarmament and development in Latin America and the Caribbean; and the Inter-American Committee against Terrorism of the Organization of American States (OAS), among others. At the same time, he complained of the cumbersome bureaucratic processes facing the professionals of the Group of Experts.
Mr VLADIMIR K. SAFRONKOV ( Russian Federation) considered resolution 1540 (2004) to be the "cornerstone" of the global non-proliferation regime, the result of a Russian-American initiative aimed at preventing weapons of mass destruction from falling into the hands of non-state actors. state. This legal instrument is a means of cooperation and "no coercion", he stressed, before reiterating that it is up to the Member States themselves to implement the provisions of this text. To properly prepare the reports, Member States must take into account the recommendations made by all relevant actors. The Committee, said the representative, should meet in open session to "identify new lines of cooperation". Fighting the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction is a priority for Russia, he said, calling for common positions to accelerate non-proliferation, "as this problem becomes more and more serious. Safronkov cited the expansion of "chemical terrorism" in Syria as evidence of the risk of non-state actors migrating to third countries with weapons of mass destruction.
Mr GBOLIÉ DÉSIRÉ WULFRAN IPO ( Ivory Coast) considered that continued efforts at the national, regional and international levels is essential to prevent non-state actors, in particular terrorist groups, from developing, possessing, manufacturing, acquiring, transporting, transfer or use weapons of mass destruction in all their forms. This fight against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction requires all stakeholders, including Member States, international and regional organizations, the private sector and civil society, to have an integrated and coordinated approach at the regional level. States must work in synergy to identify good practices to prevent the diversion of chemical agents. In this context, 
For Côte d'Ivoire, such measures should involve increased cooperation in border control, monitoring of financial flows, internet networks, legal assistance, as well as fight the evolution of the threat. For the Delegation, it was important to stress the importance of building the capacity of Member States to facilitate the implementation of their obligations. Mr. Ipo requested that the Committee continue to work to strengthen its cooperation with international, regional and subregional organizations, and to promote the exchange of information and good practices. He also welcomed the role played by the Group of Experts to assist the Committee, 
Mr ENRI PRIETO ( Peru) expressed its concern about the link between weapons of mass destruction and terrorism and considered it essential for the international community to remain united on this issue. It is also urgent to deal with the nuclear and ballistic program of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), he added. Peru, which supports the sanctions regime, hopes that the dialogue established with that Government will lead to the complete denuclearization of the Korean peninsula. The representative also called for shedding light on the use of chemical weapons in Syria. He expressed concern about the impact of "inadequate" scientific innovations on the non-proliferation regime, citing, inter alia, the illicit transfer of technology as well as illicit financial transactions. All states must have effective control measures, he said. He then spoke about the organization in Peru, last November with the help of the Committee, of a round table to support various measures, including in the field of biological weapons.
Mr WU HAITAO ( China) noted that the non-proliferation process has been strengthened, despite the growing complexity of the security environment, which requires more than ever cooperation from the international community. If the latter is to uphold international law on the basis of the non-proliferation regime, it must promote "pragmatic cooperation" based on the individual responsibility of States, while respecting their national sovereignty, the representative advocated. It is necessary, he insisted, to comply "to the letter" with the implementation of resolution 1540. The Committee must embrace the "principle of consensus" to urge States to agree. China, which strongly opposes the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery, has always fulfilled its obligations,  
Ms JOANNA WRONECKA ( Poland ) commended the innovative approach of the Indonesian Chairmanship, especially in the run-up to the comprehensive review of the resolution, scheduled for 2021. She wanted to take account of technology and its impact on non-proliferation. Noting that the obligations under resolution 1540 were not "one-off" in nature, she called on States to create national implementation plans, improve border control and combat terrorist rhetoric. She announced that Poland, with the help of the United States, will hold a three-day workshop this year on non-proliferation with a focus on the role of non-state actors.
Mr. NAWAF ASA ALAHMAD ( Kuwait ) stressed the need to strengthen the implementation of resolution 1540 to achieve universalization. He emphasized the collective efforts to ensure respect for the non-proliferation regime in the Middle East. Kuwait, he added, is concerned by the challenge posed by nuclear, chemical and biological weapons, a "growing and evolving threat" that is evolving with scientific progress.
For Mr JUERGEN SCHULZ ( Germany), the risk of non-state actors, and in particular terrorists, resorting to weapons of mass destruction is "serious". It is therefore urgent that the international community strengthen the fight against the proliferation of these weapons. Welcoming the progress made in the implementation of resolution 1540 (2004), "which remains an essential pillar of the multilateral non-proliferation architecture", he stressed the importance of pursuing these efforts and that, he added, requires countries to count on adequate assistance. In this case, the role of the Committee, which reviews requests for assistance, including those of nine countries last year, is "essential". The representative welcomed the Committee's cooperation with regional organizations,
The representative returned to the Wiesbaden Conference, held annually since 2012 for exchanges between regulators and industry to strengthen the implementation of resolution 1540. Since 2016, the International Conference has been completed. by an annual Regional Conference whose different editions were held in Korea, Mexico and India, the next being planned in Africa. The Wiesbaden Process raises awareness of this issue, encourages the exchange of information and best practices, and promotes private sector engagement, which is crucial for success in non-proliferation in a globalized world, said the representative. . He added that the involvement of the world of industry,
Mr MARTIN ERIC SIPHO NGUNDZE ( South Africa) stated that the only way to ensure that weapons of mass destruction are never used is to eliminate them completely. He welcomed the significant progress made in the implementation of resolution 1540 (2004), before rejecting any restrictions on the use of nuclear technology for peaceful purposes. The contribution of this technology to the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals should not be underestimated. Building on his country's experience in implementing the resolution, he said the challenge of proliferation can be overcome by better national export control legislation and increased international cooperation . Increased cooperation with regional organizations such as the African Union is essential, he insisted, also emphasizing technical and financial assistance to developing countries. Non-proliferation is not a goal in itself but a means to a world free of weapons of mass destruction, the representative said.
Mrs KAREN VAN VLIERBERGE ( Belgium) noted that, with 182 countries now submitting national reports on the measures taken to implement resolution 1540, it only takes 11 more States to achieve full international "reporting". The end of Daesh as a terrorist organization with a territorial base does not mean the end of the threat it represents, warned the representative. The risk of terrorist groups acquiring weapons of mass destruction remains a major concern and we must not let our guard down, he added. Ms. Van Vlierberge explained that nuclear, chemical and biological weapons in the hands of terrorist groups could provoke far more tragic attacks than those we have seen so far and which are perpetrated with improvised explosive devices, knives and small arms. To deal with this threat, Member States must be reminded of their responsibilities, she said. They must put in place legislation, controls to block non-state actors' access to nuclear, chemical or biological weapons. States must therefore fully implement the relevant resolutions and seek help where necessary. Belgium, she concluded, encouraged increased collaboration with regional organizations that can provide advice and build capacity of requesting Member States. controls to block non-state actors' access to nuclear, chemical or biological weapons. States must therefore fully implement the relevant resolutions and seek help where necessary. Belgium, she concluded, encouraged increased collaboration with regional organizations that can provide advice and build capacity of requesting Member States. controls to block non-state actors' access to nuclear, chemical or biological weapons. States must therefore fully implement the relevant resolutions and seek help where necessary. Belgium, she concluded, encouraged increased collaboration with regional organizations that can provide advice and build capacity of requesting Member States.
Addressing his national capacity, Mr. DIAN TRIANSYAH DJANI ( Indonesia ) encouraged all States that had not yet done so to submit their initial report, stating that Indonesia had updated its report in November 2018. The Indonesia will also work with the Committee to identify areas where it can provide assistance. He welcomed the adoption last month of the Committee's work program and hoped that these activities could be carefully planned to enable the Committee to achieve its objectives. He also stressed the importance, in April 2021, of the overall review of the implementation of resolution 1540.
Ms ANNE GUEGUEN ( France ) said, in turn, that resolution 1540 (2004) is a pillar of the non-proliferation architecture that underpins the entire collective security system. Fifteen years later, the non-proliferation regime continues to be put to the test, she said, adding that the raison d'être of the 1540 Committee is still relevant. France is deeply concerned by the new trend towards the proliferation of missiles, missile components and associated technologies to non-state actors in the Middle East, including the Houthi. Any transfer to Hezbollah would also be of concern.
Advocating for increased mobilization and in a national capacity, said Ms. Gueguen, each state must calibrate its efforts to implement this resolution. We must, she explained, secure the most sensitive goods and materials and strengthen export controls, especially against the risk of instrumentalization of emerging technologies. She also said that she thought of prevention and suppression of proliferation financing. Because we are more effective together, she continued, we must not deploy our efforts in isolation. It is necessary, she said, to give priority to strengthening cooperation and assistance. France, she said, attaches particular importance to the regional dimension of the coherence of offers and the need for assistance. After the regional seminars, it is necessary to go further and give priority to dynamic and interactive exercises to enable the participants to learn concrete lessons and take ownership of them. There is also a need to strengthen synergies with other bodies dealing with the same issues, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), the World Customs Organization, and the World Customs Organization. export control regimes.

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