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Security Council: calls not to "let down" the threat Daesh continues to pose

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Security Council: calls not to "let down" the threat Daesh continues to pose

Post by claud39 on Tue Feb 12, 2019 7:55 am

https://www.un.org/press/fr/2019/cs13697.doc.htm

[size=36]Security Council: calls not to "let down" the threat Daesh continues to pose[/size]




FEBRUARY 11, 2019


















The Security Council heard a number of calls this morning to strengthen international cooperation with Daesh, which remains, despite its loss of territory, the international terrorist group most likely to launch an attack on on a large scale, as the Head of the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate, Mrs Michele Coninsx. "Let's not let our guard down," said Poland, summing up the general feeling.
The Deputy Secretary-General of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau, Mr. Vladimir Voronkov, who presented the Secretary-General's eighth report * , with Ms. Coninsx, the two senior UN officials , expressed the view that Daesh remains a threat, despite a decrease in attacks in 2018. Daesh has between 14,000 and 18,000 militants, including 3,000 foreign terrorist fighters, and access to financial reserves of between 50 million and 300 million. dollars.
Its central command structure retains influence and plays an important role in advancing the group's goals, Voronkov said. The Under-Secretary-General also stressed the challenge of foreign terrorist fighters, who have returned home, are relocated or released. In Europe, the number of foreign terrorist fighters who returned during the reporting period is relatively low, he said, stressing the challenge of radicalization in prisons.
While Daesh has evolved into a more concentrated network at the local level, such as in Iraq, Syria and elsewhere, its aims of undermining stabilization efforts in conflict zones and fueling sectarian tensions must remain a source of concern. supported Ms. Coninsx. "The destructive legacy of Daesh in Syria and Iraq persists as evidenced by the millions of displaced people, the damaged infrastructure and the torn social fabric. "
The Head of the Executive Directorate emphasized the detention of a number of suspects and terrorists in many states, including foreign terrorist fighters and their families. Prosecutions must be considered in the light of rehabilitation and reintegration goals, and rehabilitation efforts in prisons or elsewhere must be linked to prosecution and reintegration, she said.
Like many delegations, Ms. Coninsx welcomed the adoption by the Counter-Terrorism Committee on 27 December 2018 of the Addendum to the Madrid Guidelines, which, according to the report, provides States with Members valuable guidance in dealing with the return and relocation of foreign terrorist fighters and their accompanying family members.
Many delegations insisted on the challenge posed by these fighters, with France pleading for measures to detain, take charge of and monitor people at risk, "via constant information sharing". She said that she emphasized the specific care of children, particularly at the socio-psychological and educational levels, to promote their reintegration.
"Children must be considered victims. They are entitled to full protection and alternatives to their detention should be favored whenever possible, "Poland said. South Africa and Germany emphasized a holistic approach, combining repressive and preventive measures.
Germany also stressed the role of advance information systems for travelers, recalling that last autumn the Netherlands made theirs available free of charge to United Nations Member States. Passenger name systems are "particularly useful" for governments, the United States added. 
Delegations stressed the importance of drying up Daesh's financial resources, which, according to the Russian Federation, is constantly seeking new funding, such as in Afghanistan, where it is engaged in mining. France has indicated that it will soon submit a draft resolution on this subject.
Finally, delegations, including those from Kuwait and Poland, stressed the need to crack down on crimes committed by Daesh. In this regard, Ms. Coninsx commended the work of the United Nations Team of Investigators to help bring Daesh / Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant to account for its crimes. Belgium and Peru, however, regretted that no Daesh member was prosecuted for sex crimes, despite the accumulated evidence.
* S / 2019/103
THREATS AGAINST INTERNATIONAL PEACE AND SECURITY RESULTING FROM ACTS OF TERRORISM
declarations
VLADIMIR VORONKOV, Under-Secretary-General for the Counter-Terrorism Bureau , presented the eighth report of the Secretary-General on " Daesh's threat to international peace and security and the work of the United Nations United Nations to help Member States to counter this threat. He said that Daesh, as an international organization with a centralized command structure, remains a threat, despite a decline in attacks worldwide in 2018. "The threat is becoming clearer with the return of foreign terrorist fighters. " 
Daesh, which has its center of gravity in Iraq and Syria and counts between 14,000 and 18,000 militants, including 3,000 foreign terrorist fighters, continued to evolve into a clandestine network operating locally, with the aim of to undermine any stabilization efforts on the ground, he said. Despite the more concealed and locally rooted nature of Daesh cells, the central command structure retains influence and plays an important role in advancing the group's goals. The Under-Secretary-General said that this situation is exacerbated by the challenge of foreign terrorist fighters, who have returned home, are relocated or released. In this context, radicalization in prisons is a real challenge in Europe and Iraq.
Some "frustrated travelers" who could not get to the heart of the conflict zone were redirected elsewhere by Daesh or left on their own, further exacerbating the threat, as has been observed in Europe and elsewhere. South East Asia. Daesh, despite its losses of territories, would still have access to financial reserves in the amount of 50 to 300 million dollars.
The residual threat posed by Daesh in Iraq comes from the local remnants of the organization and fighters crossing the border with Syria. In Africa, Daesh poses a threat to Libya and targets police stations and oil installations. In Europe, the number of foreign terrorist fighters who returned during the reporting period is relatively small. About 1,000 fighters have left the Western Balkans for the conflict zone in Iraq and Syria. Of these, 100 would have been killed and 300 would have returned. In Afghanistan, Daesh would control some training camps and have created a network of cells in various cities, including Kabul. Local officials maintain close contact with the central structure in Syria and Iraq.
In response to this threat, the Under-Secretary-General spoke about the Counter-Terrorism Committee and its Executive Directorate. My Office, he said, is a forum for exchanging best practices and expertise to better coordinate the response to the needs of States. Mr. Voronkov also recalled the Secretary-General's launch in December 2018 of the Global Counter-Terrorism Coordination Pact, aimed at strengthening the United Nations-wide joint initiative.
Despite the successes achieved by Daesh and its affiliates, the threat posed by the return and resettlement of foreign terrorist fighters, as well as those "inspired" by them, remains high and global in scope, Voronkov said. Finally, the Under-Secretary-General called for coordination of efforts in the face of the eminently "complex" threat of terrorism.
Ms. MICHELE CONINSX, Head of the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate , also drew on the Secretary-General's eighth report on "The threat posed by ISIL (Da'esh) to international peace and security and to the action by the United Nations to assist Member States in countering this threat. "
Despite the shrinking territories that provided Daesh with significant resources and a base from which to plan and launch attacks, the challenges remain numerous and complex, warned the Executive Director. The changes have forced Da'esh to adapt and evolve into a more concentrated network at the local level, as is the case in Iraq, Syria and elsewhere. But Daesh is still the international terrorist group most likely to launch a large-scale attack. Its plans to undermine stabilization and reconstruction efforts in conflict zones and fuel sectarian tensions must remain a source of concern. 
In Iraq and Syria, the Executive Director said, the destructive legacy of Daesh remains, as evidenced by the millions of displaced people, the damaged infrastructure and the torn social fabric. It will be necessary to repair these wrongs, the commitment and involvement of local, national, regional and international actors, she warned. In order to advance justice and accountability, it is essential to collect and preserve evidence by using high-risk areas in the military. States, suggested the Executive Director, may need to establish special investigative and prosecutorial bodies to support criminal justice efforts.
She then turned to the question of the detention in many states of a number of suspects and terrorists, including foreign terrorist fighters and their families. The Executive Director emphasized the protection of human rights, calling for the coherence of the "prosecution, rehabilitation and reintegration (PPR)" programs. Prosecutions, she explained, must be seen in the light of rehabilitation and reintegration goals, and rehabilitation efforts in prisons and elsewhere must be linked to prosecution and reintegration. The Executive Director also warned that terrorist groups, including Daesh and its affiliates, have continually demonstrated their ability to exploit new technologies and to seek innovative ways to circumvent barriers to their financial, technical and recruitment capabilities. The Executive Director cited the other source of concern regarding the manufacture and use by these groups of improvised explosive devices.
She nevertheless welcomed some encouraging developments, including the Addendum to the Madrid Guidelines, adopted by the Counter-Terrorism Committee on 27 December 2018. She also spoke of a joint project with the United Nations Office. against drugs and crime (UNODC) and the Counter-Terrorism Bureau, on the "targeted" strengthening of the capacity of prison staff and other stakeholders. In addition, UNODC, the Executive Directorate and the International Association of Prosecutors and Prosecutors have been working on the development of a practical guide on inter-State requests for digital evidence.
We must, the Executive Director concluded, continue to work together with Member States, regional and international organizations, civil society and academia to develop a holistic approach to the circumstances that groups like Daesh are exploiting.
Mr. JONATHAN R. COHEN ( United States) welcomed the victories won on several fronts against Daesh, including the financing of its terrorist and military operations. The coalition, he said, is assisting the Iraqi security forces in their offensive and in clearing the territories formerly occupied by the terrorist organization. However, warned the representative, there is still much to be done, Daesh has varied its operating procedures and operating in new theaters of conflict, as in Afghanistan. He supported the efforts of the Executive Directorate to assist Member States in fulfilling their obligations under relevant Security Council resolutions, including the development of PNR systems "particularly useful" for Governments. The representative also encouraged them to facilitate the reintegration of former combatants and to ensure respect for human rights. We can not slow our efforts in the fight against the Islamic State, warned Mr. Cohen.
Mr. GUSTAVO MEZA-CUADRA ( Peru ) acknowledged the serious threat posed by the return of foreign terrorist fighters and their families, noting the importance of the guidelines for detecting and preventing the movement of terrorists. National criminal justice systems must play an important role in preventing prisons from turning into spaces for radicalization, he said, before advocating that the fight against terrorism include the gender perspective and is concerned about the impact of the fight against terrorism. terrorism on children.
Regarding the financing of the Islamic State, he reiterated the importance of having financial intelligence systems. He also recommended deepening knowledge on the nature of terrorist financing. It is necessary, he added, to prevent terrorist groups, in particular Daesh, from benefiting from trafficking in cultural heritage, in accordance with resolution 2347 (2017). Finally, he called for ensuring that the crimes committed do not go unpunished, regretting that so far no Daesh member has been prosecuted for sex crimes while it has been found that sexual violence was used as a terrorist tactic.
Mr MARIUSZ LEWICKI ( Poland ) urged "not to let down" against Daesh even though it lost control of territories, recalling the heinous attacks that have hit Afghanistan, Kenya and the Philippines. He called on Member States to increase their efforts to freeze the assets of individuals and entities on the sanctions lists for Daesh and al-Qaida. He said women and children associated with foreign terrorist fighters who are returning or relocated should receive "special assistance".
The representative requested that the addendum to the Madrid Guidelines be used to properly measure the impact of terrorist activities on the rights of children. "Children must be considered victims. They are entitled to full protection and alternatives to detention should be preferred whenever possible. Finally, the delegate called for increased efforts to bring terrorists to justice, welcoming the efforts of the United Nations Team of Investigators to bring ISIS / ISIS to Iraq. of the Levant to answer for his crimes.
Mr. VASSILY A. NEBENZIA ( Russian Federation ) echoed several evaluations contained in the report of the Secretary-General. Once again, we stress that any interaction with individuals or entities involved in the conduct of Daesh is contrary to relevant Security Council resolutions, he said. Losing ground, Daesh activists are now trying to build synergies with other terrorist organizations, said the representative. He recalled that Russia contributes to the normalization of relations between Syria and Iraq, and that it is important to work in cooperation with the Governments of these two Member States.
His delegation was concerned about the persistent problems of returning foreign fighters to their country of origin. Moreover, according to Russia, the actions of the Islamic State in Afghanistan demonstrate that Daesh still has a nuisance power. The representative also noted that last fall, the organization's terrorist fighters seized holdings in Syria, from which they derived substantial revenues. ISIS attacks are financed not only by the sale of minerals and hydrocarbons, but also by fishery products, online gambling, e-commerce fraud, or counterfeiting, Nebenzia said. . This group is constantly looking for new ways of financing, as in Afghanistan, where it is engaged in mining, he insisted. He wished to draw attention to the Russian Federation's investigation into the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), reiterating Moscow's commitment to a constructive dialogue with all interested parties. 
Mr. WU HAITAO ( China ) said that terrorism is "the common enemy" of humanity and that no country can "go it alone". Efforts against this scourge must be part of the United Nations Charter, including respect for national sovereignty. He emphasized the importance of curbing the financial resources of terrorist groups and building the capacity of developing countries. He advocated for the proper implementation of the Addendum to the Madrid Guidelines for Managing the Return and Relocation of Foreign Terrorist Fighters.
Mr JONATHAN GUY ALLEN ( United Kingdom ) said that the fight against Daesh continued to be a priority for his country, because of the means of action still available to that organization. He recalled that London had invited the CLC Executive Board to assess the situation in the UK, with the UK government hoping to share its best practices, while expressing its willingness to take advantage of lessons learned from other Member States. For the representative, it is necessary to redouble efforts to ensure that the response is up to the challenges.
He then denounced the exploitation of women to carry out attacks, when they are not targeted themselves by such attacks. However, his delegation stressed that women are also key partners in mobilizing and developing responses. While Member States are the first to fulfill the obligations of Security Council resolutions, the fact remains that "we must work together to achieve tangible results," said Allen. conclusion.
Mr FRANCOIS DELATTRE ( France ) noted that, despite the loss of its territorial roots, Daesh remains the most ambitious terrorist group. He called for continued action by the International Coalition against Daesh, in support of the implementation of pluralistic and inclusive political solutions in Syria and Iraq, "the only lasting response to prevent the re-emergence of Daesh under other forms ". The crimes committed by Daesh must be repressed, he claimed, notably by pleading for a solid international judicial cooperation. "The fight against the financing of terrorism is a priority of my country," he added, adding that France has decided to present a draft resolution on this subject.
Faced with the challenge of managing the return of terrorist fighters, Delattre called for measures to detain, take charge of and monitor people at risk, "through constant information sharing". In its national framework, France emphasizes the specific care of children, particularly at the socio-psychological and educational levels, to promote their reintegration. The representative also stressed the importance of preventing the use of the Internet by terrorist groups. "We are counting on the Counter-Terrorism Bureau and the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate to continue to pursue, as their mandates allow, more cross-cutting issues such as respect for and the promotion of human rights or the protection of human rights. taking into account the gender dimension. "
Mr JUERGEN SCHULZ ( Germany) considered that situations in Iraq and Syria require vigilance. He advocated a holistic approach against terrorists, providing for both repressive and preventive measures. For foreign terrorist fighters and their "returnee" families, judicial and criminal measures are just as important as those for de-radicalization in prisons and reintegration. After highlighting the role of advance passenger information systems, he recalled that last autumn the Netherlands made available free of charge to United Nations Member States. He also welcomed the initiative of France to present a resolution on the fight against the financing of terrorism. Mr. 
Mr. MANSOUR AYYAD SH. A. ALOTAIBI ( Kuwait) noted the large number of foreign terrorist fighters leaving conflict zones, returning home or being released from prison. He called for drying up the financial resources of Daesh, which would still have access to financial reserves in the amount of 50 to 300 million dollars. We must also fight against terrorist propaganda, he said, calling for the implementation of the relevant resolutions. He stressed the need to best establish responsibility for the crimes committed by Daesh before praising Iraq's efforts against Daesh. While the International Coalition has been successful against Daesh, the latter, which has a central command structure, remains a threat to international peace and security, the Kuwaiti delegate said.
Mr JERRY MATTHEWS MATJILA ( South Africa) stated that the United Nations plays a key role in coordinating the international community's efforts against Daesh. He called for a holistic approach against terrorism, saying preventive measures are just as important as security measures. He supported the addendum to the Madrid Guidelines and mentioned his country's efforts in combating the financing of terrorism. The measures taken to combat the threat posed by Daesh must respect international law, he said. Finally, concerned about the activities of terrorist groups in sub-Saharan Africa with ties to Daesh, Matjila emphasized efforts to ensure that the "destructive presence" of Daesh does not take root in the region.
Mr GBOLIÉ DÉSIRÉ WULFRAN IPO ( Ivory Coast) felt that, despite the setbacks, Daesh remains a real threat to international peace and security, thanks to its adaptability, the attraction of terrorist propaganda and its strong financial reserve, amount between 50 and 300 million US dollars. In this context, only a holistic approach on the part of the international community will make it possible to meet the challenges that continue to arise, the representative suggested. At the national level, States must prevent radicalization by improving coordination between intelligence and law enforcement agencies. With this in mind, Ipo said, they will need to develop strategies for managing and controlling the flow of foreign fighters. Similarly, the reinforcement of the air security measures proves essential, passing by a better awareness of the risks and by a sharing of the temporary files. In addition, strong public-private cooperation mechanisms must be put in place to combat the financing of terrorism. Finally, with regard to the role of the United Nations, the representative welcomed the work of the Counter-Terrorism Committee and its Executive Directorate, which led to the adoption on 27 December 2018 of Madrid 2015 Guiding Principles to assist Member States in responding to the return and relocation of foreign terrorist fighters and their families. He also welcomed the launch on 6 December of the Global Counter-Terrorism Coordination Pact. through increased risk awareness and sharing of transient records. In addition, strong public-private cooperation mechanisms must be put in place to combat the financing of terrorism. Finally, with regard to the role of the United Nations, the representative welcomed the work of the Counter-Terrorism Committee and its Executive Directorate, which led to the adoption on 27 December 2018 of Madrid 2015 Guiding Principles to assist Member States in responding to the return and relocation of foreign terrorist fighters and their families. He also welcomed the launch on 6 December of the Global Counter-Terrorism Coordination Pact. through increased risk awareness and sharing of transient records. In addition, strong public-private cooperation mechanisms must be put in place to combat the financing of terrorism. Finally, with regard to the role of the United Nations, the representative welcomed the work of the Counter-Terrorism Committee and its Executive Directorate, which led to the adoption on 27 December 2018 of Madrid 2015 Guiding Principles to assist Member States in responding to the return and relocation of foreign terrorist fighters and their families. He also welcomed the launch on 6 December of the Global Counter-Terrorism Coordination Pact. In addition, strong public-private cooperation mechanisms must be put in place to combat the financing of terrorism. Finally, with regard to the role of the United Nations, the representative welcomed the work of the Counter-Terrorism Committee and its Executive Directorate, which led to the adoption on 27 December 2018 of Madrid 2015 Guiding Principles to assist Member States in responding to the return and relocation of foreign terrorist fighters and their families. He also welcomed the launch on 6 December of the Global Counter-Terrorism Coordination Pact. In addition, strong public-private cooperation mechanisms must be put in place to combat the financing of terrorism. Finally, with regard to the role of the United Nations, the representative welcomed the work of the Counter-Terrorism Committee and its Executive Directorate, which led to the adoption on 27 December 2018 of Madrid 2015 Guiding Principles to assist Member States in responding to the return and relocation of foreign terrorist fighters and their families. He also welcomed the launch on 6 December of the Global Counter-Terrorism Coordination Pact. Finally, with regard to the role of the United Nations, the representative welcomed the work of the Counter-Terrorism Committee and its Executive Directorate, which led to the adoption on 27 December 2018 of Madrid 2015 Guiding Principles to assist Member States in responding to the return and relocation of foreign terrorist fighters and their families. He also welcomed the launch on 6 December of the Global Counter-Terrorism Coordination Pact. Finally, with regard to the role of the United Nations, the representative welcomed the work of the Counter-Terrorism Committee and its Executive Directorate, which led to the adoption on 27 December 2018 of Madrid 2015 Guiding Principles to assist Member States in responding to the return and relocation of foreign terrorist fighters and their families. He also welcomed the launch on 6 December of the Global Counter-Terrorism Coordination Pact. additions to the 2015 Madrid Guidelines to assist Member States in dealing with the return and relocation of foreign terrorist fighters and their families. He also welcomed the launch on 6 December of the Global Counter-Terrorism Coordination Pact. additions to the 2015 Madrid Guidelines to assist Member States in dealing with the return and relocation of foreign terrorist fighters and their families. He also welcomed the launch on 6 December of the Global Counter-Terrorism Coordination Pact.
Mr MARC PECSTEEN DE BUYRSWERVE ( Belgium) found that although Daesh, as a territorial entity, has been virtually defeated and transformed into an underground international network, its negative impact on international security remains substantial, attracting certain individuals, including in Europe. In this context, Belgium, he explained, has opted for a holistic approach to fight against radicalization, focusing not only on repression but also on prevention and reintegration in society, which also applies. foreign terrorist fighters and their families returning to their country of origin. At the same time, Brussels acknowledged its international obligations in humanitarian matters and respect for human rights, said the delegation, which stressed the priority given by his country to the return of children under 10 years. 
Mr. Pecsteen de Buyrswerve emphasized that the addendum to the recently adopted Madrid Guidelines is very useful in the implementation of Security Council resolution 2396 (2017). The representative then said he was very much in favor of the new resolution on the financing of terrorism announced by France, before recalling that the promotion of justice and the fight against impunity are paramount in the eyes of his government. It was concerned, however, that despite evidence of Daesh sexual violence, no prosecution of these crimes has been opened to date.
Mr. JOSÉ MANUEL TRULLOLS ( Dominican Republic ) called for increased cooperation between States in the face of Daesh, whose ability to adapt he noted. Nearly 20 per cent of foreign terrorist fighters are women and children, he said, noting the degree of coercion exercised on these women and children. "We must recognize this situation and cooperate. The representative welcomed the adoption of the addendum to the Madrid Guidelines to deal with the return and relocation of foreign terrorist fighters. Finally, he called for drying up the financial resources of terrorist groups, especially cybercrime, by arguing, once again, for effective international cooperation.
Mr. DIAN TRIANSYAH DJANI ( Indonesia ) drew attention to the threat posed by terrorism in South-East Asia. Indeed, "the defeat of Daesh in Syria was followed by a transfer of its activities in our region," said the representative, citing propaganda, radicalization and recruitment. He also expressed concern about the focus on women and children by terrorist organizations, and the lack of flexibility for departing candidates for Syria, who have been unable to leave their national territory, and are vulnerable to time to turn against their country of origin.
Given the protean and evolving nature of the terrorist challenge, Member States must develop an innovative and concrete approach, Mr. Djani advocated, with a focus on international cooperation. In this regard, the promotion of dialogue, tolerance and moderation remains the best way to defeat hatred and avoid conditions conducive to the spread of terrorism, the delegation said. All measures taken in the fight against terrorism must be in compliance with international humanitarian law, human rights and the Charter of the United Nations, she added.
Mr. ANATOLIO NDONG MBA ( Equatorial Guinea) also welcomed the adoption in December 2018 by the Counter-Terrorism Committee of the Addendum to the Madrid Guidelines. In this regard, he stressed the importance of training and technical assistance for States to be able to implement the 17 Principles, in particular those relating to border controls. Combating the financing of terrorism is also one of the most important strategic tools in which Member States must engage in the future, the representative said. In Africa, Daesh is mainly present in the North, in East and West Africa. But it is also necessary to identify and neutralize the "lone wolves", which pose a threat increasingly difficult to predict.


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