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 Mountain Goat Special Edition: The Real Santa Claus 12/23/17

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Mountain Goatee
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PostSubject: Mountain Goat Special Edition: The Real Santa Claus 12/23/17   Sat Dec 23, 2017 3:57 pm



December 23, 2017 Mnt Goat News Brief

Special Edition: The Real Santa Claus

So many of you participated in my survey as to the question of is Santa Claus real or not. The audience was split as many said he is only for kids and many said he is for adults. I can only assume you meant that Santa was only an imaginary folklore for the kids and that the adults can also partake in the present giving that Santa is so widely known for.

Well,,,, for all you folks who doubted there is a Santa Claus I have to tell you SANTA CLAUS IS REAL!

Yes, Santa is real! So, when you go tell (if you tell) your young children the folklore of Santa, you no longer have to feel guilty about your lying to them. You can say it with a straight face ..lol..lol….

So let’s discover the real Santa Claus today while we wait for this RV to take place. Okay? After all its Christmas time and we await our own kind of presents from Santa too during this long RV saga.

More news….

The true story of Santa Claus begins with Nicholas, who was born during the third century in the village of Patara. At the time the area was Greek and is now on the southern coast of Turkey.

His wealthy parents, who raised him to be a devout Christian, died in an epidemic while Nicholas was still young. Obeying Jesus' words to "sell what you own and give the money to the poor," Nicholas used his whole inheritance to assist the needy, the sick, and the suffering. He dedicated his life to serving God AND WAS MADE BISHOP OF MYRA while still a young man. Bishop Nicholas became known throughout the land for his generosity to those in need, his love for children, and his concern for sailors and ships.

Under the Roman Emperor Diocletian, who ruthlessly persecuted Christians, Bishop Nicholas suffered for his faith, was exiled and imprisoned. The prisons were so full of bishops, priests, and deacons, there was no room for the real criminals—murderers, thieves and robbers.

After his release, Nicholas attended the Council of Nicaea in AD 325. He died December 6, AD 343 in Myra and was buried in his cathedral church, where a unique relic, called manna, formed in his grave. This liquid substance, said to have healing powers, fostered the growth of devotion to Nicholas. The anniversary of his death became a day of celebration, St. Nicholas Day, December 6th (December 19 on the Julian Calendar).

So how did St Nicholas get connected with Christmas?

Well you can see the December link already since he died in December. But what about all the other seemingly strange features of Santa Claus. How they they develop as what we readily accept as folklore today? After all this saintly figure head has been miraculously carried down now for hundreds of years. Don’t you find that amazing?

If you read the history of Santa Claus below you will find the most dramatic changes occurring in modern times in the 19th and 20th centuries. But the important part that I am trying to emphasize is that the St. Nicholas legacy has been maintained all these hundreds of years and like many other legions and folklores of the past, he could have very easily been lost. But it wasn’t and so is this our human nature to want to remember the good and honest people as our idols? Are these the ones we remember the most? We will find today that it is not the red suit or the tangible gifts that he brings, but the hope, love and continued idea of caring and protecting of children.

Through the centuries many stories and legends have been told of St. Nicholas' life and deeds. These accounts help us understand his extraordinary character and why he is so beloved and revered as protector and helper of those in need. St. Nicholas has continued to be venerated by Catholics and Orthodox and honored by Protestants.

By his example of generosity to those in need, especially children, St. Nicholas continues to be a model for the compassionate life.

Widely celebrated in Europe, St. Nicholas' feast day, December 6th, kept alive the stories of his goodness and generosity. In Germany and Poland, boys dressed as bishops begged alms for the poor—and sometimes for themselves! In the Netherlands and Belgium, St. Nicholas arrived on a steamship from Spain to ride a white horse on his gift-giving rounds.

December 6th is still the main day for gift giving and merrymaking in much of Europe. For example, in the Netherlands St. Nicholas is celebrated on the 5th, the eve of the day, by sharing candies (thrown in the door), chocolate initial letters, small gifts, and riddles. Dutch children leave carrots and hay in their shoes for the saint's horse, hoping St. Nicholas will exchange them for small gifts.

Simple gift-giving in early Advent helps preserve a Christmas Day focus on the Christ Child.

More news….

How did the kindly Christian saint, good Bishop Nicholas, become a roly-poly red-suited American symbol for merry holiday festivity and commercial activity? History tells the tale.

The first Europeans to arrive in the New World brought St. Nicholas. Vikings dedicated their cathedral to him in Greenland.

On his first voyage, Columbus named a Haitian port for St. Nicholas on December 6, 1492.

In Florida, Spaniards named an early settlement St. Nicholas Ferry, now known as Jacksonville.

However, St. Nicholas had a difficult time during the 16th century Protestant Reformation which took a dim view of saints. Even though both reformers and counter-reformers tried to stamp out St. Nicholas-related customs, they had very little long-term success except in England where the religious folk traditions were permanently altered. (It is ironic that fervent Puritan Christians began what turned into a trend to a more secular Christmas observance.) Because the common people so loved St. Nicholas, he survived on the European continent as people continued to place nuts, apples, and sweets in shoes left beside beds, on windowsills, or before the hearth.

The first Colonists in the America, primarily Puritans and other Protestant reformers, did not bring Nicholas traditions to the New World. What about the Dutch?

Although it is almost universally believed that the Dutch brought St. Nicholas to New Amsterdam, scholars find scant evidence of such traditions in Dutch New Netherland.

More news….

- Evidence that Colonial Germans in Pennsylvania kept the feast of St. Nicholas, and several later accounts have St. Nicholas visiting New York Dutch on New Years' Eve, thus adopting the English custom (New Year gift-giving had become the English custom in 1558, supplanting Nicholas, and this English custom lasted in New York until 1847).

In 1773 New York non-Dutch patriots formed the Sons of St. Nicholas, primarily as a non-British symbol to counter the English St. George societies, rather than to honor St. Nicholas. This society was similar to the Sons of St. Tammany in Philadelphia. Not exactly St. Nicholas, the children's gift-giver.

More news….

->After the American Revolution, New Yorkers remembered with pride their colony's nearly-forgotten Dutch roots. John Pintard, the influential patriot and antiquarian who founded the New York Historical Society in 1804, promoted St. Nicholas as patron saint of both society and city.

In January 1809, Washington Irving joined the society and on St. Nicholas Day that same year, he published the satirical fiction, Knickerbocker's History of New York, with numerous references to a jolly St. Nicholas character. This was not the saintly bishop, rather an elfin Dutch burgher with a clay pipe. These delightful flights of imagination are the source of the New Amsterdam St. Nicholas legends: that the first Dutch emigrant ship had a figurehead of St. Nicholas; that St. Nicholas Day was observed in the colony; that the first church was dedicated to him; and that St. Nicholas comes down chimneys to bring gifts. Irving's work was regarded as the "first notable work of imagination in the New World."

-The New York Historical Society held its first St. Nicholas anniversary dinner on December 6, 1810. John Pintard commissioned artist Alexander Anderson TO CREATE THE FIRST AMERICAN IMAGE OF NICHOLAS for the occasion. NICHOLAS WAS SHOWN IN A GIFT-GIVING ROLE WITH CHILDREN'S TREATS IN STOCKINGS HANGING AT A FIREPLACE.

The accompanying poem ends, "Saint Nicholas, my dear good friend! To serve you ever was my end, If you will, now, me something give, I'll serve you ever while I live."

More news….

Now we see the connection begin with the Christmas season of December 25th.

The 19th century was a time of cultural transition. New York writers, and others, wanted to domesticate the Christmas holiday.

After Puritans and other Calvinists had eliminated Christmas as a holy season, popular celebrations became riotous, featuring drunken men and public disorder. Christmas of old was not the images we imagine today of families gathered cozily around hearth and tree exchanging pretty gifts and singing carols while smiling benevolently at children.

Rather, it was characterized by raucous, drunken mobs roaming streets, damaging property, threatening and frightening the upper classes. The holiday season, coming after harvest when work was eased and more leisure possible, was a time when workers and servants took the upper hand, demanding largess and more.

Through the first half of the 19th century, Presbyterians, Baptists, Quakers and other Protestants continued to regard December 25th as a day without religious significance, a day for normal business. This was not a neutral stance, rather Christmas observance was seen as inconsistent with gospel worship. Industrialists were happy to reduce workers' leisure time and allowed many fewer holidays than existed in Europe.

More news….

All of this began to change AS A NEW UNDERSTANDING OF FAMILY LIFE AND THE PLACE OF CHILDREN WAS EMERGING. Childhood was coming to be seen as a stage of life in which greater protection, sheltering, training and education were needed. And so, the season came gradually to be tamed, turning toward shops and home. St. Nicholas, too, took on new attributes to fit the changing times.

1821 brought some new elements with publication of the first lithographed book in America, the Children's Friend. THIS "SANTA CLAUS" ARRIVED FROM THE NORTH IN A SLEIGH WITH A FLYING REINDEER for the first time.

The anonymous poem and illustrations proved pivotal in shifting imagery away from a saintly bishop. Santa Claus fit a didactic mode, REWARDING GOOD BEHAVIOR AND PUNISHING BAD, leaving a "long, black birchen rod . . . directs a Parent's hand to use when virtue's path his sons refuse." Gifts were safe toys, "pretty doll . . . peg-top, or a ball; no crackers, cannons, squibs, or rockets to blow their eyes up, or their pockets. No drums to stun their Mother's ear, nor swords to make their sisters fear; but pretty books to store their mind with knowledge of each various kind." The sleigh itself even sported a bookshelf for the "pretty books." THE BOOK ALSO NOTABLY MARKED S. CLAUS' FIRST APPEARANCE ON CHRISTMAS EVE, RATHER THAN DECEMBER 6TH.

-The jolly elf image for the first time received another big boost in 1823, from a poem destined to become immensely popular, "A Visit from St. Nicholas," now better known as "The Night Before Christmas."

He was dressed all in fur, from his head to his foot,

And his clothes were all tarnished with ashes and soot;

A bundle of toys he had flung on his back,

And he looked like a peddler just opening his pack.

His eyes—how they twinkled! his dimples how merry!

His cheeks were like roses, his nose like a cherry!

His droll little mouth was drawn up like a bow,

And the beard of his chin was as white as the snow;

The stump of a pipe he held tight in his teeth,

And the smoke it encircled his head like a wreath;

He had a broad face and a little round belly,

That shook, when he laughed like a bowlful of jelly.

He was chubby and plump, a right jolly old elf. . . .

WASHINGTON IRVING'S ST. NICHOLAS STRONGLY INFLUENCED THE POEM'S PORTRAYAL OF A ROUND, PIPE-SMOKING, ELF-LIKE ST. NICHOLAS. The poem generally has been attributed to Clement Clark Moore, a professor of biblical languages at New York's Episcopal General Theological Seminary. Moore was a friend and neighbor of William Gilley, who had published Sancte Claus in 1821:

Old Santeclaus with much delight

His reindeer drives the frosty night

O'er chimney tops and tracks of snow

To bring his yearly gifts to you.

However, a case has been made by Don Foster in Author Unknown, that Henry Livingston actually penned it in 1807 or 1808. Livingston was a farmer/patriot who wrote humorous verse for children.

In any case, "A Visit from St. Nicholas" became a defining American holiday classic. No matter who wrote it, the poem has had enormous influence on the Americanization of St. Nicholas.

So this where we stand today. St Nicholas is a fat, jolly older man with long whiskers, dressed in a red suit. He travels on his reindeer powered slay and begins his journey world wide on Christmas eve December 24th. He slides down the chimney to enter the home to bring gifts to children and adults alike. Then, like he arrived, he soon is gone in a flash until next year. The big question is will we, as investors in the Iraqi dinar, see Santa early in 2018?

Merry Christmas Everyone

and

a Very Happy New Year!

Their words not mine…..No Rumors, No Hype, No Opinions ,,,,,

Just the FACTS!

In ending I want everyone to know your constant prayers in the fight against evil (ISIS) in Iraq have worked. God has guided these young men and women on the battle field. Let us all now also keep praying. I have composed a prayer maybe we can all pray today in our own way and until the revaluation occurs.

PRAYER

“For the prime minister and all his cabinet members, and parliament that they may be anointed by the Holy Spirit to do God’s will and bring the free Republic of Iraq to the much-deserved prosperity and abundance thru justice and freedom from oppression and corruption”. That they may be a shining example for the rest of the middle east and the world to follow. In the name of Jesus Christ our King and Savior, Amen”

Auf Wiedersehen

Much love to ya all,

Mnt Goat



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PostSubject: Re: Mountain Goat Special Edition: The Real Santa Claus 12/23/17   Sat Dec 23, 2017 5:57 pm

@Mnt. Goat wrote:
The true story of Santa Claus begins with Nicholas, who was born during the third century in the village of Patara. At the time the area was Greek and is now on the southern coast of Turkey.

His wealthy parents, who raised him to be a devout Christian, died in an epidemic while Nicholas was still young. Obeying Jesus' words to "sell what you own and give the money to the poor," Nicholas used his whole inheritance to assist the needy, the sick, and the suffering. He dedicated his life to serving God AND WAS MADE BISHOP OF MYRA while still a young man. Bishop Nicholas became known throughout the land for his generosity to those in need, his love for children, and his concern for sailors and ships.

Under the Roman Emperor Diocletian, who ruthlessly persecuted Christians, Bishop Nicholas suffered for his faith, was exiled and imprisoned. The prisons were so full of bishops, priests, and deacons, there was no room for the real criminals—murderers, thieves and robbers.

After his release, Nicholas attended the Council of Nicaea in AD 325. He died December 6, AD 343 in Myra and was buried in his cathedral church, where a unique relic, called manna, formed in his grave. This liquid substance, said to have healing powers, fostered the growth of devotion to Nicholas. The anniversary of his death became a day of celebration, St. Nicholas Day, December 6th (December 19 on the Julian Calendar).
stnicholascenter.org wrote:

The true story of Santa Claus begins with Nicholas, who was born during the third century in the village of Patara. At the time the area was Greek and is now on the southern coast of Turkey. His wealthy parents, who raised him to be a devout Christian, died in an epidemic while Nicholas was still young. Obeying Jesus' words to "sell what you own and give the money to the poor," Nicholas used his whole inheritance to assist the needy, the sick, and the suffering. He dedicated his life to serving God and was made Bishop of Myra while still a young man. Bishop Nicholas became known throughout the land for his generosity to those in need, his love for children, and his concern for sailors and ships.
Under the Roman Emperor Diocletian, who ruthlessly persecuted Christians, Bishop Nicholas suffered for his faith, was exiled and imprisoned. The prisons were so full of bishops, priests, and deacons, there was no room for the real criminals—murderers, thieves and robbers. After his release, Nicholas attended the Council of Nicaea in AD 325. He died December 6, AD 343 in Myra and was buried in his cathedral church, where a unique relic, called manna, formed in his grave. This liquid substance, said to have healing powers, fostered the growth of devotion to Nicholas. The anniversary of his death became a day of celebration, St. Nicholas Day, December 6th (December 19 on the Julian Calendar).
http://www.stnicholascenter.org/pages/who-is-st-nicholas/



Does Mnt. Goat plagiarize much?
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PostSubject: Re: Mountain Goat Special Edition: The Real Santa Claus 12/23/17   Sat Dec 23, 2017 6:18 pm

Yep, Good 'ol Santa and his 3 'Ho's- However, poor 'ol Rudolph will NOT be leading the team this year- It seems he picked his nose and got electrocuted....... :nxbxfb: couch
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